Occupy Toronto user pics

Occupy Toronto user pics

Some cool Occupy Toronto images: The Royal Canadian Navy Show: “Meet the Navy”: Herbert C. Barber Image by bill barber In 1943/44 my dad, who was enlisted in the Royal Canadian Navy, travelled with the Navy Show which was entitled, "Meet the Navy". Not sure he was actually in the cast, so I’ll have to pull his file at Archives Canada in Ottawa. Since he was a Certified Public Accountant, he might have watched the books. The show went across Canada by train. I know that Dad was not with the production that went overseas in 1945. Dad is second from the right in the above photo. Here’s the story of the Navy Show: From my Herbert Charles Barber Collection www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/collections/7215760076… "Meet the Navy" was a Royal Canadian Navy musical revue produced during World War II under the supervision of Capt Joseph P. Connolly, director of Special Services for the RCN. Rehearsals began in June 1943 at Hart House in Toronto. The production staff and company were recognized officially, though somewhat after the fact, by a Government of Canada Treasury Board order-in-council, 13 Aug 1943, as ‘an Establishment to be known as "The Navy Show" for the… Entertainment of Naval, Army and Air Force personnel on Active Service; Promotion of recruiting; [and] Maintenance of public morale and goodwill’. The show itself, called "Meet the Navy" and directed by Louis Silver (a Hollywood producer) and Larry Ceballos (a Broadway choreographer), was premiered for servicemen 2 September at Toronto’s Victoria Theatre and opened to the public 4 September. It opened in Ottawa 15 September at the Capitol Theatre (Ottawa). During a year-long national tour, which covered some 10,000 miles by train, Meet the Navy entertained about a half-million Canadians. It travelled in 1944 to Britain, opening 23 October in Glasgow and touring England (11 cities in the provinces), Ireland, and Wales and playing at the Hippodrome in London (1 Feb-7 Apr 1945, including a command performance 28 February). Performances followed in Paris’ Théâtre Marigny, the Brussels Music Hall, and Amsterdam’s Carré Theatre. Meet the Navy closed 12 September in Oldenburg in occupied Germany. In 1945 the National Film Board produced the film Meet the Navy on Tour. Though plans for a Broadway run fell through, the show itself was filmed in November in Britain. Meet the Navy included skits, dance routines, and several songs: ‘In Your Little Chapeau,’ ‘Rockettes and the Wrens,’ ‘Brothers-in-Arms,’ ‘Meet the Navy,’ and ‘Beauty on Duty,’ all by R.W. Harwood (words) and P.E. Quinn (music); ‘The Boys in the Bellbottom Trousers’ by Quinn; ‘Shore Leave’ by Noel Langley and Henry Sherman (words) and Quinn; and the showstopper (sung by John Pratt) ‘You’ll Get Used to It’, with words by Pratt to music by Freddy Grant. Eric Wild (who conducted the pit orchestra) and Robert Russell Bennett arranged the music. Leading roles were taken by Pratt, Robert Goodier, Cameron Grant, and Lionel Merton. Other featured performers included Dixie Dean, Ivan Romanoff (who conducted a balalaika orchestra and a chorus in ‘Scena Russki’), Carl Tapscott (who did choral arrangements), the bass Oscar Natzke, and the dance team Alan and Blanche Lund. Members of the 25-piece orchestra included the violinists Victor Feldbrill, Bill Richards, and Joseph Sera, the trombonist Ted Elfstrom, and the saxophonist-clarinetist Howard ‘Cokie’ Campbell. After the London debut of Meet the Navy, Beverley Baxter wrote in the London Evening Standard: ‘Why is this piece so exhilarating, so completely satisfying and, since the first class always touches the emotions, why was it so stirring? Perhaps the answer is that quite outside the professional slickness and the terrific pace of the whole thing, we were seeing the story of Canada unconsciously unfolding itself to our eyes’. In 1980, to celebrate the 70th anniversary of the Canadian navy, the Nova Scotia government revived Meet the Navy with several members of the original cast. Phillips, Ruth. ‘The history of the Royal Canadian Navy’s World War II show Meet the Navy,’ unpublished manuscript (1973) Southworth, Jean. ‘Actor revives his wartime role,’ Ottawa Journal, 19 Aug 1980 From: The Encyclopaedia of Music in Canada www.thecanadianencyclopedia.com/index.cfm?PgNm=TCE&Pa… The Royal Canadian Navy Show: “Meet the Navy”: Herbert C. Barber Image by bill barber In 1943/44 my dad, who was enlisted in the Royal Canadian Navy, travelled with the Navy Show which was entitled, "Meet the Navy". Not sure he was actually in the cast, so I’ll have to pull his file at Archives Canada in Ottawa. Since he was a Certified Public Accountant, he might have watched the books. The show went across Canada by train. I know that Dad was not with the production that went overseas in 1945. Dad is second from the right in the above photo. Here’s the story of the Navy Show: From my Herbert Charles Barber Collection www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/collections/7215760076… "Meet the Navy" was a Royal Canadian Navy musical revue produced during World War II under the supervision of Capt Joseph P. Connolly, director of Special Services for the RCN. Rehearsals began in June 1943 at Hart House in Toronto. The production staff and company were recognized officially, though somewhat after the fact, by a Government of Canada Treasury Board order-in-council, 13 Aug 1943, as ‘an Establishment to be known as "The Navy Show" for the… Entertainment of Naval, Army and Air Force personnel on Active Service; Promotion of recruiting; [and] Maintenance of public morale and goodwill’. The show itself, called "Meet the Navy" and directed by Louis Silver (a Hollywood producer) and Larry Ceballos (a Broadway choreographer), was premiered for servicemen 2 September at Toronto’s Victoria Theatre and opened to the public 4 September. It opened in Ottawa 15 September at the Capitol Theatre (Ottawa). During a year-long national tour, which covered some 10,000 miles by train, Meet the Navy entertained about a half-million Canadians. It travelled in 1944 to Britain, opening 23 October in Glasgow and touring England (11 cities in the provinces), Ireland, and Wales and playing at the Hippodrome in London (1 Feb-7 Apr 1945, including a command performance 28 February). Performances followed in Paris’ Théâtre Marigny, the Brussels Music Hall, and Amsterdam’s Carré Theatre. Meet the Navy closed 12 September in Oldenburg in occupied Germany. In 1945 the National Film Board produced the film Meet the Navy on Tour. Though plans for a Broadway run fell through, the show itself was filmed in November in Britain. Meet the Navy included skits, dance routines, and several songs: ‘In Your Little Chapeau,’ ‘Rockettes and the Wrens,’ ‘Brothers-in-Arms,’ ‘Meet the Navy,’ and ‘Beauty on Duty,’ all by R.W. Harwood (words) and P.E. Quinn (music); ‘The Boys in the Bellbottom Trousers’ by Quinn; ‘Shore Leave’ by Noel Langley and Henry Sherman (words) and Quinn; and the showstopper (sung by John Pratt) ‘You’ll Get Used to It’, with words by Pratt to music by Freddy Grant. Eric Wild (who conducted the pit orchestra) and Robert Russell Bennett arranged the music. Leading roles were taken by Pratt, Robert Goodier, Cameron Grant, and Lionel Merton. Other featured performers included Dixie Dean, Ivan Romanoff (who conducted a balalaika orchestra and a chorus in ‘Scena Russki’), Carl Tapscott (who did choral arrangements), the bass Oscar Natzke, and the dance team Alan and Blanche Lund. Members of the 25-piece orchestra included the violinists Victor Feldbrill, Bill Richards, and Joseph Sera, the trombonist Ted Elfstrom, and the saxophonist-clarinetist Howard ‘Cokie’ Campbell. After the London debut of Meet the Navy, Beverley Baxter wrote in the London Evening Standard: ‘Why is this piece so exhilarating, so completely satisfying and, since the first class always touches the emotions, why was it so stirring? Perhaps the answer is that quite outside the professional slickness and the terrific pace of the whole thing, we were seeing the story of Canada unconsciously unfolding itself to our eyes’. In 1980, to celebrate the 70th anniversary of the Canadian navy, the Nova Scotia government revived Meet the Navy with several members of the original cast. Phillips, Ruth. ‘The history of the Royal Canadian Navy’s World War II show Meet the Navy,’ unpublished manuscript (1973) Southworth, Jean. ‘Actor revives his wartime role,’ Ottawa Journal, 19 Aug 1980 From: The Encyclopaedia of Music in Canada www.thecanadianencyclopedia.com/index.cfm?PgNm=TCE&Pa… The Royal Canadian Navy Show: “Meet the Navy”: Herbert C. Barber Image by bill barber In 1943/44 my dad, who was enlisted in the Royal Canadian Navy, travelled with the Navy Show which was entitled, "Meet the Navy". Not sure he was actually in the cast, so I’ll have to pull his file at Archives Canada in Ottawa. Since he was a Certified Public Accountant, he might have watched the books. The show went across Canada by train. I know that Dad was not with the production that went overseas in 1945. Dad is second from the right in the above photo. Here’s the story of the Navy Show: From my Herbert Charles Barber Collection www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/collections/7215760076… "Meet the Navy" was a Royal Canadian Navy musical revue produced during World War II under the supervision of Capt Joseph P. Connolly, director of Special Services for the RCN. Rehearsals began in June 1943 at Hart House in Toronto. The production staff and company were recognized officially, though somewhat after the fact, by a Government of Canada Treasury Board order-in-council, 13 Aug 1943, as ‘an Establishment to be known as "The Navy Show" for the… Entertainment of Naval, Army and Air Force personnel on Active Service; Promotion of recruiting; [and] Maintenance of public morale and goodwill’. The show itself, called "Meet the Navy" and directed by Louis Silver (a Hollywood producer) and Larry Ceballos (a Broadway choreographer), was premiered for servicemen 2 September at Toronto’s Victoria Theatre and opened to the public 4 September. It opened in Ottawa 15 September at the Capitol Theatre (Ottawa). During a year-long national tour, which covered some 10,000 miles by train, Meet the Navy entertained about a half-million Canadians. It travelled in 1944 to Britain, opening 23 October in Glasgow and touring England (11 cities in the provinces), Ireland, and Wales and playing at the Hippodrome in London (1 Feb-7 Apr 1945, including a command performance 28 February). Performances followed in Paris’ Théâtre Marigny, the Brussels Music Hall, and Amsterdam’s Carré Theatre. Meet the Navy closed 12 September in Oldenburg in occupied Germany. In 1945 the National Film Board produced the film Meet the Navy on Tour. Though plans for a Broadway run fell through, the show itself was filmed in November in Britain. Meet the Navy included skits, dance routines, and several songs: ‘In Your Little Chapeau,’ ‘Rockettes and the Wrens,’ ‘Brothers-in-Arms,’ ‘Meet the Navy,’ and ‘Beauty on Duty,’ all by R.W. Harwood (words) and P.E. Quinn (music); ‘The Boys in the Bellbottom Trousers’ by Quinn; ‘Shore Leave’ by Noel Langley and Henry Sherman (words) and Quinn; and the showstopper (sung by John Pratt) ‘You’ll Get Used to It’, with words by Pratt to music by Freddy Grant. Eric Wild (who conducted the pit orchestra) and Robert Russell Bennett arranged the music. Leading roles were taken by Pratt, Robert Goodier, Cameron Grant, and Lionel Merton. Other featured performers included Dixie Dean, Ivan Romanoff (who conducted a balalaika orchestra and a chorus in ‘Scena Russki’), Carl Tapscott (who did choral arrangements), the bass Oscar Natzke, and the dance team Alan and Blanche Lund. Members of the 25-piece orchestra included the violinists Victor Feldbrill, Bill Richards, and Joseph Sera, the trombonist Ted Elfstrom, and the saxophonist-clarinetist Howard ‘Cokie’ Campbell. After the London debut of Meet the Navy, Beverley Baxter wrote in the London Evening Standard: ‘Why is this piece so exhilarating, so completely satisfying and, since the first class always touches the emotions, why was it so stirring? Perhaps the answer is that quite outside the professional slickness and the terrific pace of the whole thing, we were seeing the story of Canada unconsciously unfolding itself to our eyes’. In 1980, to celebrate the 70th anniversary of the Canadian navy, the Nova Scotia government revived Meet the Navy with several members of the original cast. Phillips, Ruth. ‘The history of the Royal Canadian Navy’s World War II show Meet the Navy,’ unpublished manuscript (1973) Southworth, Jean. ‘Actor revives his wartime role,’ Ottawa Journal, 19 Aug 1980 From: The Encyclopaedia of Music in Canada www.thecanadianencyclopedia.com/index.cfm?PgNm=TCE&Pa… The Royal Canadian Navy Show: “Meet the Navy”: Herbert C. Barber Image by bill barber In 1943/44 my dad, who was enlisted in the Royal Canadian Navy, travelled with the Navy Show which was entitled, "Meet the Navy". Not sure he was actually in the cast, so I’ll have to pull his file at Archives Canada in Ottawa. Since he was a Certified Public Accountant, he might have watched the books. The show went across Canada by train. I know that Dad was not with the production that went overseas in 1945. Dad is second from the right in the above photo. Here’s the story of the Navy Show: From my Herbert Charles Barber Collection www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/collections/7215760076… "Meet the Navy" was a Royal Canadian Navy musical revue produced during World War II under the supervision of Capt Joseph P. Connolly, director of Special Services for the RCN. Rehearsals began in June 1943 at Hart House in Toronto. The production staff and company were recognized officially, though somewhat after the fact, by a Government of Canada Treasury Board order-in-council, 13 Aug 1943, as ‘an Establishment to be known as "The Navy Show" for the… Entertainment of Naval, Army and Air Force personnel on Active Service; Promotion of recruiting; [and] Maintenance of public morale and goodwill’. The show itself, called "Meet the Navy" and directed by Louis Silver (a Hollywood producer) and Larry Ceballos (a Broadway choreographer), was premiered for servicemen 2 September at Toronto’s Victoria Theatre and opened to the public 4 September. It opened in Ottawa 15 September at the Capitol Theatre (Ottawa). During a year-long national tour, which covered some 10,000 miles by train, Meet the Navy entertained about a half-million Canadians. It travelled in 1944 to Britain, opening 23 October in Glasgow and touring England (11 cities in the provinces), Ireland, and Wales and playing at the Hippodrome in London (1 Feb-7 Apr 1945, including a command performance 28 February). Performances followed in Paris’ Théâtre Marigny, the Brussels Music Hall, and Amsterdam’s Carré Theatre. Meet the Navy closed 12 September in Oldenburg in occupied Germany. In 1945 the National Film Board produced the film Meet the Navy on Tour. Though plans for a Broadway run fell through, the show itself was filmed in November in Britain. Meet the Navy included skits, dance routines, and several songs: ‘In Your Little Chapeau,’ ‘Rockettes and the Wrens,’ ‘Brothers-in-Arms,’ ‘Meet the Navy,’ and ‘Beauty on Duty,’ all by R.W. Harwood (words) and P.E. Quinn (music); ‘The Boys in the Bellbottom Trousers’ by Quinn; ‘Shore Leave’ by Noel Langley and Henry Sherman (words) and Quinn; and the showstopper (sung by John Pratt) ‘You’ll Get Used to It’, with words by Pratt to music by Freddy Grant. Eric Wild (who conducted the pit orchestra) and Robert Russell Bennett arranged the music. Leading roles were taken by Pratt, Robert Goodier, Cameron Grant, and Lionel Merton. Other featured performers included Dixie Dean, Ivan Romanoff (who conducted a balalaika orchestra and a chorus in ‘Scena Russki’), Carl Tapscott (who did choral arrangements), the bass Oscar Natzke, and the dance team Alan and Blanche Lund. Members of the 25-piece orchestra included the violinists Victor Feldbrill, Bill Richards, and Joseph Sera, the trombonist Ted Elfstrom, and the saxophonist-clarinetist Howard ‘Cokie’ Campbell. After the London debut of Meet the Navy, Beverley Baxter wrote in the London Evening Standard: ‘Why is this piece so exhilarating, so completely satisfying and, since the first class always touches the emotions, why was it so stirring? Perhaps the answer is that quite outside the professional slickness and the terrific pace of the whole thing, we were seeing the story of Canada unconsciously unfolding itself to our eyes’. In 1980, to celebrate the 70th anniversary of the Canadian navy, the Nova Scotia government revived Meet the Navy with several members of the original cast. Phillips, Ruth. ‘The history of the Royal Canadian Navy’s World War II show Meet the Navy,’ unpublished manuscript (1973) Southworth, Jean. ‘Actor revives his wartime role,’ Ottawa Journal, 19 Aug 1980 From: The Encyclopaedia of Music in Canada www.thecanadianencyclopedia.com/index.cfm?PgNm=TCE&Pa…...

More  Occupy Toronto photos

More Occupy Toronto photos

Check out these Occupy Toronto images: The Royal Canadian Navy Show: “Meet the Navy”: Herbert C. Barber Image by bill barber In 1943/44 my dad, who was enlisted in the Royal Canadian Navy, travelled with the Navy Show which was entitled, "Meet the Navy". Not sure he was actually in the cast, so I’ll have to pull his file at Archives Canada in Ottawa. Since he was a Certified Public Accountant, he might have watched the books. The show went across Canada by train. I know that Dad was not with the production that went overseas in 1945. Dad is second from the right in the above photo. Here’s the story of the Navy Show: From my Herbert Charles Barber Collection www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/collections/7215760076… "Meet the Navy" was a Royal Canadian Navy musical revue produced during World War II under the supervision of Capt Joseph P. Connolly, director of Special Services for the RCN. Rehearsals began in June 1943 at Hart House in Toronto. The production staff and company were recognized officially, though somewhat after the fact, by a Government of Canada Treasury Board order-in-council, 13 Aug 1943, as ‘an Establishment to be known as "The Navy Show" for the… Entertainment of Naval, Army and Air Force personnel on Active Service; Promotion of recruiting; [and] Maintenance of public morale and goodwill’. The show itself, called "Meet the Navy" and directed by Louis Silver (a Hollywood producer) and Larry Ceballos (a Broadway choreographer), was premiered for servicemen 2 September at Toronto’s Victoria Theatre and opened to the public 4 September. It opened in Ottawa 15 September at the Capitol Theatre (Ottawa). During a year-long national tour, which covered some 10,000 miles by train, Meet the Navy entertained about a half-million Canadians. It travelled in 1944 to Britain, opening 23 October in Glasgow and touring England (11 cities in the provinces), Ireland, and Wales and playing at the Hippodrome in London (1 Feb-7 Apr 1945, including a command performance 28 February). Performances followed in Paris’ Théâtre Marigny, the Brussels Music Hall, and Amsterdam’s Carré Theatre. Meet the Navy closed 12 September in Oldenburg in occupied Germany. In 1945 the National Film Board produced the film Meet the Navy on Tour. Though plans for a Broadway run fell through, the show itself was filmed in November in Britain. Meet the Navy included skits, dance routines, and several songs: ‘In Your Little Chapeau,’ ‘Rockettes and the Wrens,’ ‘Brothers-in-Arms,’ ‘Meet the Navy,’ and ‘Beauty on Duty,’ all by R.W. Harwood (words) and P.E. Quinn (music); ‘The Boys in the Bellbottom Trousers’ by Quinn; ‘Shore Leave’ by Noel Langley and Henry Sherman (words) and Quinn; and the showstopper (sung by John Pratt) ‘You’ll Get Used to It’, with words by Pratt to music by Freddy Grant. Eric Wild (who conducted the pit orchestra) and Robert Russell Bennett arranged the music. Leading roles were taken by Pratt, Robert Goodier, Cameron Grant, and Lionel Merton. Other featured performers included Dixie Dean, Ivan Romanoff (who conducted a balalaika orchestra and a chorus in ‘Scena Russki’), Carl Tapscott (who did choral arrangements), the bass Oscar Natzke, and the dance team Alan and Blanche Lund. Members of the 25-piece orchestra included the violinists Victor Feldbrill, Bill Richards, and Joseph Sera, the trombonist Ted Elfstrom, and the saxophonist-clarinetist Howard ‘Cokie’ Campbell. After the London debut of Meet the Navy, Beverley Baxter wrote in the London Evening Standard: ‘Why is this piece so exhilarating, so completely satisfying and, since the first class always touches the emotions, why was it so stirring? Perhaps the answer is that quite outside the professional slickness and the terrific pace of the whole thing, we were seeing the story of Canada unconsciously unfolding itself to our eyes’. In 1980, to celebrate the 70th anniversary of the Canadian navy, the Nova Scotia government revived Meet the Navy with several members of the original cast. Phillips, Ruth. ‘The history of the Royal Canadian Navy’s World War II show Meet the Navy,’ unpublished manuscript (1973) Southworth, Jean. ‘Actor revives his wartime role,’ Ottawa Journal, 19 Aug 1980 From: The Encyclopaedia of Music in Canada www.thecanadianencyclopedia.com/index.cfm?PgNm=TCE&Pa… The Royal Canadian Navy Show: “Meet the Navy”: Herbert C. Barber Image by bill barber In 1943/44 my dad, who was enlisted in the Royal Canadian Navy, travelled with the Navy Show which was entitled, "Meet the Navy". Not sure he was actually in the cast, so I’ll have to pull his file at Archives Canada in Ottawa. Since he was a Certified Public Accountant, he might have watched the books. The show went across Canada by train. I know that Dad was not with the production that went overseas in 1945. Dad is second from the right in the above photo. Here’s the story of the Navy Show: From my Herbert Charles Barber Collection www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/collections/7215760076… "Meet the Navy" was a Royal Canadian Navy musical revue produced during World War II under the supervision of Capt Joseph P. Connolly, director of Special Services for the RCN. Rehearsals began in June 1943 at Hart House in Toronto. The production staff and company were recognized officially, though somewhat after the fact, by a Government of Canada Treasury Board order-in-council, 13 Aug 1943, as ‘an Establishment to be known as "The Navy Show" for the… Entertainment of Naval, Army and Air Force personnel on Active Service; Promotion of recruiting; [and] Maintenance of public morale and goodwill’. The show itself, called "Meet the Navy" and directed by Louis Silver (a Hollywood producer) and Larry Ceballos (a Broadway choreographer), was premiered for servicemen 2 September at Toronto’s Victoria Theatre and opened to the public 4 September. It opened in Ottawa 15 September at the Capitol Theatre (Ottawa). During a year-long national tour, which covered some 10,000 miles by train, Meet the Navy entertained about a half-million Canadians. It travelled in 1944 to Britain, opening 23 October in Glasgow and touring England (11 cities in the provinces), Ireland, and Wales and playing at the Hippodrome in London (1 Feb-7 Apr 1945, including a command performance 28 February). Performances followed in Paris’ Théâtre Marigny, the Brussels Music Hall, and Amsterdam’s Carré Theatre. Meet the Navy closed 12 September in Oldenburg in occupied Germany. In 1945 the National Film Board produced the film Meet the Navy on Tour. Though plans for a Broadway run fell through, the show itself was filmed in November in Britain. Meet the Navy included skits, dance routines, and several songs: ‘In Your Little Chapeau,’ ‘Rockettes and the Wrens,’ ‘Brothers-in-Arms,’ ‘Meet the Navy,’ and ‘Beauty on Duty,’ all by R.W. Harwood (words) and P.E. Quinn (music); ‘The Boys in the Bellbottom Trousers’ by Quinn; ‘Shore Leave’ by Noel Langley and Henry Sherman (words) and Quinn; and the showstopper (sung by John Pratt) ‘You’ll Get Used to It’, with words by Pratt to music by Freddy Grant. Eric Wild (who conducted the pit orchestra) and Robert Russell Bennett arranged the music. Leading roles were taken by Pratt, Robert Goodier, Cameron Grant, and Lionel Merton. Other featured performers included Dixie Dean, Ivan Romanoff (who conducted a balalaika orchestra and a chorus in ‘Scena Russki’), Carl Tapscott (who did choral arrangements), the bass Oscar Natzke, and the dance team Alan and Blanche Lund. Members of the 25-piece orchestra included the violinists Victor Feldbrill, Bill Richards, and Joseph Sera, the trombonist Ted Elfstrom, and the saxophonist-clarinetist Howard ‘Cokie’ Campbell. After the London debut of Meet the Navy, Beverley Baxter wrote in the London Evening Standard: ‘Why is this piece so exhilarating, so completely satisfying and, since the first class always touches the emotions, why was it so stirring? Perhaps the answer is that quite outside the professional slickness and the terrific pace of the whole thing, we were seeing the story of Canada unconsciously unfolding itself to our eyes’. In 1980, to celebrate the 70th anniversary of the Canadian navy, the Nova Scotia government revived Meet the Navy with several members of the original cast. Phillips, Ruth. ‘The history of the Royal Canadian Navy’s World War II show Meet the Navy,’ unpublished manuscript (1973) Southworth, Jean. ‘Actor revives his wartime role,’ Ottawa Journal, 19 Aug 1980 From: The Encyclopaedia of Music in Canada www.thecanadianencyclopedia.com/index.cfm?PgNm=TCE&Pa… The Royal Canadian Navy Show: “Meet the Navy”: Herbert C. Barber Image by bill barber In 1943/44 my dad, who was enlisted in the Royal Canadian Navy, travelled with the Navy Show which was entitled, "Meet the Navy". Not sure he was actually in the cast, so I’ll have to pull his file at Archives Canada in Ottawa. Since he was a Certified Public Accountant, he might have watched the books. The show went across Canada by train. I know that Dad was not with the production that went overseas in 1945. Dad is second from the right in the above photo. Here’s the story of the Navy Show: From my Herbert Charles Barber Collection www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/collections/7215760076… "Meet the Navy" was a Royal Canadian Navy musical revue produced during World War II under the supervision of Capt Joseph P. Connolly, director of Special Services for the RCN. Rehearsals began in June 1943 at Hart House in Toronto. The production staff and company were recognized officially, though somewhat after the fact, by a Government of Canada Treasury Board order-in-council, 13 Aug 1943, as ‘an Establishment to be known as "The Navy Show" for the… Entertainment of Naval, Army and Air Force personnel on Active Service; Promotion of recruiting; [and] Maintenance of public morale and goodwill’. The show itself, called "Meet the Navy" and directed by Louis Silver (a Hollywood producer) and Larry Ceballos (a Broadway choreographer), was premiered for servicemen 2 September at Toronto’s Victoria Theatre and opened to the public 4 September. It opened in Ottawa 15 September at the Capitol Theatre (Ottawa). During a year-long national tour, which covered some 10,000 miles by train, Meet the Navy entertained about a half-million Canadians. It travelled in 1944 to Britain, opening 23 October in Glasgow and touring England (11 cities in the provinces), Ireland, and Wales and playing at the Hippodrome in London (1 Feb-7 Apr 1945, including a command performance 28 February). Performances followed in Paris’ Théâtre Marigny, the Brussels Music Hall, and Amsterdam’s Carré Theatre. Meet the Navy closed 12 September in Oldenburg in occupied Germany. In 1945 the National Film Board produced the film Meet the Navy on Tour. Though plans for a Broadway run fell through, the show itself was filmed in November in Britain. Meet the Navy included skits, dance routines, and several songs: ‘In Your Little Chapeau,’ ‘Rockettes and the Wrens,’ ‘Brothers-in-Arms,’ ‘Meet the Navy,’ and ‘Beauty on Duty,’ all by R.W. Harwood (words) and P.E. Quinn (music); ‘The Boys in the Bellbottom Trousers’ by Quinn; ‘Shore Leave’ by Noel Langley and Henry Sherman (words) and Quinn; and the showstopper (sung by John Pratt) ‘You’ll Get Used to It’, with words by Pratt to music by Freddy Grant. Eric Wild (who conducted the pit orchestra) and Robert Russell Bennett arranged the music. Leading roles were taken by Pratt, Robert Goodier, Cameron Grant, and Lionel Merton. Other featured performers included Dixie Dean, Ivan Romanoff (who conducted a balalaika orchestra and a chorus in ‘Scena Russki’), Carl Tapscott (who did choral arrangements), the bass Oscar Natzke, and the dance team Alan and Blanche Lund. Members of the 25-piece orchestra included the violinists Victor Feldbrill, Bill Richards, and Joseph Sera, the trombonist Ted Elfstrom, and the saxophonist-clarinetist Howard ‘Cokie’ Campbell. After the London debut of Meet the Navy, Beverley Baxter wrote in the London Evening Standard: ‘Why is this piece so exhilarating, so completely satisfying and, since the first class always touches the emotions, why was it so stirring? Perhaps the answer is that quite outside the professional slickness and the terrific pace of the whole thing, we were seeing the story of Canada unconsciously unfolding itself to our eyes’. In 1980, to celebrate the 70th anniversary of the Canadian navy, the Nova Scotia government revived Meet the Navy with several members of the original cast. Phillips, Ruth. ‘The history of the Royal Canadian Navy’s World War II show Meet the Navy,’ unpublished manuscript (1973) Southworth, Jean. ‘Actor revives his wartime role,’ Ottawa Journal, 19 Aug 1980 From: The Encyclopaedia of Music in Canada www.thecanadianencyclopedia.com/index.cfm?PgNm=TCE&Pa… The Royal Canadian Navy Show: “Meet the Navy”: Herbert C. Barber Image by bill barber In 1943/44 my dad, who was enlisted in the Royal Canadian Navy, travelled with the Navy Show which was entitled, "Meet the Navy". Not sure he was actually in the cast, so I’ll have to pull his file at Archives Canada in Ottawa. Since he was a Certified Public Accountant, he might have watched the books. The show went across Canada by train. I know that Dad was not with the production that went overseas in 1945. Dad is second from the right in the above photo. Here’s the story of the Navy Show: From my Herbert Charles Barber Collection www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/collections/7215760076… "Meet the Navy" was a Royal Canadian Navy musical revue produced during World War II under the supervision of Capt Joseph P. Connolly, director of Special Services for the RCN. Rehearsals began in June 1943 at Hart House in Toronto. The production staff and company were recognized officially, though somewhat after the fact, by a Government of Canada Treasury Board order-in-council, 13 Aug 1943, as ‘an Establishment to be known as "The Navy Show" for the… Entertainment of Naval, Army and Air Force personnel on Active Service; Promotion of recruiting; [and] Maintenance of public morale and goodwill’. The show itself, called "Meet the Navy" and directed by Louis Silver (a Hollywood producer) and Larry Ceballos (a Broadway choreographer), was premiered for servicemen 2 September at Toronto’s Victoria Theatre and opened to the public 4 September. It opened in Ottawa 15 September at the Capitol Theatre (Ottawa). During a year-long national tour, which covered some 10,000 miles by train, Meet the Navy entertained about a half-million Canadians. It travelled in 1944 to Britain, opening 23 October in Glasgow and touring England (11 cities in the provinces), Ireland, and Wales and playing at the Hippodrome in London (1 Feb-7 Apr 1945, including a command performance 28 February). Performances followed in Paris’ Théâtre Marigny, the Brussels Music Hall, and Amsterdam’s Carré Theatre. Meet the Navy closed 12 September in Oldenburg in occupied Germany. In 1945 the National Film Board produced the film Meet the Navy on Tour. Though plans for a Broadway run fell through, the show itself was filmed in November in Britain. Meet the Navy included skits, dance routines, and several songs: ‘In Your Little Chapeau,’ ‘Rockettes and the Wrens,’ ‘Brothers-in-Arms,’ ‘Meet the Navy,’ and ‘Beauty on Duty,’ all by R.W. Harwood (words) and P.E. Quinn (music); ‘The Boys in the Bellbottom Trousers’ by Quinn; ‘Shore Leave’ by Noel Langley and Henry Sherman (words) and Quinn; and the showstopper (sung by John Pratt) ‘You’ll Get Used to It’, with words by Pratt to music by Freddy Grant. Eric Wild (who conducted the pit orchestra) and Robert Russell Bennett arranged the music. Leading roles were taken by Pratt, Robert Goodier, Cameron Grant, and Lionel Merton. Other featured performers included Dixie Dean, Ivan Romanoff (who conducted a balalaika orchestra and a chorus in ‘Scena Russki’), Carl Tapscott (who did choral arrangements), the bass Oscar Natzke, and the dance team Alan and Blanche Lund. Members of the 25-piece orchestra included the violinists Victor Feldbrill, Bill Richards, and Joseph Sera, the trombonist Ted Elfstrom, and the saxophonist-clarinetist Howard ‘Cokie’ Campbell. After the London debut of Meet the Navy, Beverley Baxter wrote in the London Evening Standard: ‘Why is this piece so exhilarating, so completely satisfying and, since the first class always touches the emotions, why was it so stirring? Perhaps the answer is that quite outside the professional slickness and the terrific pace of the whole thing, we were seeing the story of Canada unconsciously unfolding itself to our eyes’. In 1980, to celebrate the 70th anniversary of the Canadian navy, the Nova Scotia government revived Meet the Navy with several members of the original cast. Phillips, Ruth. ‘The history of the Royal Canadian Navy’s World War II show Meet the Navy,’ unpublished manuscript (1973) Southworth, Jean. ‘Actor revives his wartime role,’ Ottawa Journal, 19 Aug 1980 From: The Encyclopaedia of Music in Canada www.thecanadianencyclopedia.com/index.cfm?PgNm=TCE&Pa…...

Nice Occupy Toronto photos

Nice Occupy Toronto photos

A few nice Occupy Toronto images I found: Battle Royal… over Image by Sweet One I wasn’t willing to wait 45 minutes in line to get in… so when I got back around 6 am, it was over! 🙁 Battle Royal, 2009 Shaun El C. Leonardo – New York City, USA Performance Art Inspired by Ralph Ellison’s The Invisible Man, 20 men will enter Toronto’s original bus depot with lingering art-deco design and step into a 17’ steel cage. Shaun El Conquistador Leonardo (artist and trained fighter) along with 19 of Canada’s elite pro-wrestlers will fight blindfolded until only one man is left standing. The match is an intense, theatrical recreation of the book’s opening scene also entitled Battle Royal. Occupying a space between literary representation, wrestling spectacle and art performance, Battle Royal is an unscripted event harkening back to the actual fight to-the-end bouts African Americans were encouraged to enter for prize winnings during post-slavery American South; while manifesting the artist’s own personal fear of societal invisibility. Beginning at 7pm members of the audience are invited to be blindfolded and escorted into the cage where they will have the opportunity to feel the intimidation and potential of aggression Battle Royal encompasses. Gradually, as the night reaches its peak, professional wrestlers will be introduced to the ring, initiating the action while the artist, Shaun El C. Leonardo, seeks to withstand the pain, embarrassment and discomfort of struggling in front of eyes without having sight himself. Battle Royal… over Image by Sweet One I wasn’t willing to wait 45 minutes in line to get in… so when I got back around 6 am, it was over! 🙁 Battle Royal, 2009 Shaun El C. Leonardo – New York City, USA Performance Art Inspired by Ralph Ellison’s The Invisible Man, 20 men will enter Toronto’s original bus depot with lingering art-deco design and step into a 17’ steel cage. Shaun El Conquistador Leonardo (artist and trained fighter) along with 19 of Canada’s elite pro-wrestlers will fight blindfolded until only one man is left standing. The match is an intense, theatrical recreation of the book’s opening scene also entitled Battle Royal. Occupying a space between literary representation, wrestling spectacle and art performance, Battle Royal is an unscripted event harkening back to the actual fight to-the-end bouts African Americans were encouraged to enter for prize winnings during post-slavery American South; while manifesting the artist’s own personal fear of societal invisibility. Beginning at 7pm members of the audience are invited to be blindfolded and escorted into the cage where they will have the opportunity to feel the intimidation and potential of aggression Battle Royal encompasses. Gradually, as the night reaches its peak, professional wrestlers will be introduced to the ring, initiating the action while the artist, Shaun El C. Leonardo, seeks to withstand the pain, embarrassment and discomfort of struggling in front of eyes without having sight himself. Image by John Brownlow Century farmhouse, Airport Road. Now occupied by a sikh family. The land around it is under is being developed as tract housing....

Mark Carney assumes the head of Bank of England

on July 1. Generating some $ 1.4 million a year and a housing allowance. Possessing left Canada 5 years into a 7 year term as governor. He dropped the Bank of Canada price from 4.25% in 2008 to an all time low of .25% and letting it rise back to 1% exactly where is has sat because September 2010&#8230The British Media will go right after him and his &#8220eco warrior&#8221 wife http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/story/2013/06/28/f-vp-don-pittis-carney-media.html &nbsp...

Rob Ford’s pal/current employees member David Price

calls into the Ford Show to praise his boss and correct wing policies even though denigrating anybody who opposes him! I listen each and every now and then to Newstalk/&#8221Opiniontalk&#8221 1010 on Sundays and I am often amused at the nature &amp personalities that contact. It is seems to be a set up&#8230and/or screened&#8230 http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/toronto/story/2013/06/26/toronto-rob-ford-staffer-suspended.html &nbsp...

Alberta Floods

I was watching Question Period these days as Jason Kenney claimed that the &#8220scientist&#8221 he spoke to didn&#8217t believe climate alter had to do with the flood. Hello! The Conservatives have been mussling scientists since their idealogy don&#8217t want to believe Man has a part in growing GHGs and climate change. Unfortunately, Calgary is wholey represented by conservatives/correct wingers at all levels of government. The federal Conservatives are postponing their Convention and the flood harm will go into subsequent week and generate difficulties for the &#8220Calgary Stampede&#8221 http://www.thestar.com/news/canada/2013/06/23/alberta_flooding_calgary_assesses_damage_as_higher_water_heads_east.html &nbsp...

Bankster of Canada

has a new governor in Stephen Poloz from the Export Trade and Development Bank. Replacing Mark Carney who is leaving once again keeping the BoC price at 1% and Prime at three% Poloz in the past has worked in the BoC beneath the Mulroney government. On June 1 there was a protest on Parliament Hill for the adjust more than&#8230 http://www.cbc.ca/news/company/story/2013/05/31/f-carney-poloz-handover-bank-of-canada-pittis.html &nbsp...

Occupy Toronto user pics

Occupy Toronto user pics

A few nice Occupy Toronto images I found: I REMEMBER Image by marc falardeau Canadian may be evicted, but we are still polite (only in canada, would someone say thank you to an eviction? occupy Toronto Image by schmopinions occupy Toronto Image by schmopinions Occupy Toronto Image by jess-sanson...

Occupy Toronto photos

Occupy Toronto photos

Some cool Occupy Toronto images: Occupy Toronto – Back On Site After The Arrest – Outside Barrick Gold AGM Board Meeting Image by Metrix X (Left) Rev. Alexa Gilmour of the United Church of Canada the afternoon after she was arrested for setting up a place of worship. #OccupyToronto #OccupyBayStreet #Occupy – Stanley Cup Guy Image by Jason Hargrove Occupy Toronto is a peaceful protest that began on October 15, 2011 in Toronto, Ontario, near Bay Street in the Financial District of the downtown core. It is related to the ongoing Occupy Wall Street movement that began in New York City on September 17, 2011, also protesting against economic inequality, corporate greed, and the influence of corporations and lobbyists on government. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Occupy_Toronto + Photography by Jason Hargrove jasonhargrove.com...

Conservative PM claims ignorance

as his chief of employees Nigel Wright resigns more than gifting Mike Duffy funds and the initial time in a extended time we hear &#8220I&#8217m sorry&#8221 from Harper. Unfortunately, there is a cover up of the original audit which ensnares Conservative senators David Tkachuk and Carolyn Stewart Olsen who altered the findings much to the chagrin of Liberal senator George Furey who is on that committee&#8230 http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/prince-edward-island/story/2013/05/23/pol-letters-duffy-senate-investigation.html &nbsp...

Thatcher the snatcher

took away milk from youngsters as Education Minister prior to becoming PM in England. She thought Mandela was a terrorist and counted Pinochet as a pal. Chile in the 70s &amp 80s is where the Chicago College very first attempted out their financial policies(we get in touch with Neoliberalism) Which have been enacted by Thatcher, Reagan whose death was also celebrated in 2003. Ofcourse Canada had Mulroney&#8230 issues went poor in 2008 http://www.thestar.com/news/canada/2013/04/ten/thatcherism_and_margaret_thatcher_are_both_dead_walkom.html &nbsp...

Royal Banksters in Canada outsource jobs

when in fact there are Canadians who are qualified. 45 have to train their replacements just so the corporation can spend the new workers much less&#8230.all although 54,000 jobs were lost in March and the unemployment price went up to 7.two% genuinely something closer to 11-12% http://www.thestar.com/opinion/commentary/2013/04/15/short-term_foreign_worker_issue_goes_effectively_beyond_rbc.html...

Conservative Senator Mike Duffy

claims to live in PEI and got some $ 90,172  housing allowance which somebody else paid back for him to avoid an embarrissing audit. Nigel Wright a milllionaire works for the PMO and tried to aid out a crony. Duffy must go&#8230and so should Wright http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/story/2013/05/16/pol-duffy-senate-expenses.html &nbsp...

The HarperCons drop the budget Mar. 21

No doubt laden with austerity cuts even though continuing with tax cuts for Corporations. All the although running a Deficit for a sixth year in spite of promising &#8220balanced budgets and fiscal duty.&#8221 The revenues are coming in reduce below their poor stewardship of the Economy beneath a majority government even though Evil Corporations sit on many hundred billion dollars of cash&#8230and politician&#8217s wasteful spending on Advertisements telling how wonderful things are when we know that living through it is not so Finance Minister Jim Flaherty will deliver a federal budget on March 21, the same day the parliamentary budget officer, Kevin Page, is due in court in an attempt to clarify his mandate and get federal departments to hand over more financial information. Flaherty announced the budget date Thursday in Ottawa after meeting with a group of students from a national charitable organization, who provided their own input on what they want in the spending plan. The Harper government is expected to further tighten purse strings and avoid significant new spending in the budget. The minister has indicated the budget will project modest growth in the short term, close tax loopholes and look to secure better results for the government’s billions of dollars in job-training funding. Many of the private sector economists Flaherty regularly consults in setting the government’s economic forecasts are predicting sluggish economic growth in 2013 of between 1.5% and 1.8%. For many fiscal conservatives, a better label for these annual events would be Economic Inaction Plans. Budgets, after all, are not the fuel of growth. They are the government’s plans to take money out of the economy via taxes and spend it on a million different things. And as the United States has learned, government spending does not necessarily create growth, but the tax increases extracted to finance that spending can certainly undermine growth. The Harper Government re-branded its budgets as “action plans” in the heat of the 2008 financial meltdown. It began with the 2009 budget, a document that came with a label on the cover in large type — “Canada’s Economic Action Plan”— and dramatic descriptions of a global economy in the grip of “the most synchronized recession in the post-war period fuelled in part by the worst financial market crisis since the 1930s.” The action plan would “boost confidence and economic growth and support Canadians and their families during this period of economic weakness.” It was a multi-faceted effort, a “stimulus plan” that would spread money all over the country to help Canada emerge from recession “stronger, with a modernized, greener infrastructure, a renewed science and research base, a more skilled labour force, lower taxes and a more competitive economy.” This “stimulus phase” of the plan supposedly ended last year. In a “final report” on the plan last year, Ottawa claimed it had “steered the economy through the deepest global recession since the 1930s” and has positioned Canada to succeed in the new global economic order. http://opinion.financialpost.com/2013/03/14/terence-corcoran-tory-action-plans-sow-seeds-of-economic-inaction/  ...

Conservative senator Pamela Wallin

who spent much less than half a year in Saskatchewan has claims of $ 321,027 in &#8220other travel&#8221 expensives whilst Liberal Mac Harb gets a look more than on &#8220housing&#8221 expenditures and Patrick Brazeau is kicked out of Conservatives cronies&#8230 http://www.thestar.com/news/canada/2013/02/14/audit_of_senator_pamela_wallins_expenses_to_remain_secret_says_david_tkachuk.html &nbsp...

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