Some cool Occupy Toronto images:

The Royal Canadian Navy Show: “Meet the Navy”: Herbert C. Barber
Occupy Toronto
Image by bill barber
In 1943/44 my dad, who was enlisted in the Royal Canadian Navy, travelled with the Navy Show which was entitled, "Meet the Navy". Not sure he was actually in the cast, so I’ll have to pull his file at Archives Canada in Ottawa. Since he was a Certified Public Accountant, he might have watched the books. The show went across Canada by train. I know that Dad was not with the production that went overseas in 1945.

Dad is second from the right in the above photo. Here’s the story of the Navy Show:

From my Herbert Charles Barber Collection
www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/collections/7215760076…

"Meet the Navy" was a Royal Canadian Navy musical revue produced during World War II under the supervision of Capt Joseph P. Connolly, director of Special Services for the RCN. Rehearsals began in June 1943 at Hart House in Toronto. The production staff and company were recognized officially, though somewhat after the fact, by a Government of Canada Treasury Board order-in-council, 13 Aug 1943, as ‘an Establishment to be known as "The Navy Show" for the… Entertainment of Naval, Army and Air Force personnel on Active Service; Promotion of recruiting; [and] Maintenance of public morale and goodwill’.

The show itself, called "Meet the Navy" and directed by Louis Silver (a Hollywood producer) and Larry Ceballos (a Broadway choreographer), was premiered for servicemen 2 September at Toronto’s Victoria Theatre and opened to the public 4 September. It opened in Ottawa 15 September at the Capitol Theatre (Ottawa). During a year-long national tour, which covered some 10,000 miles by train, Meet the Navy entertained about a half-million Canadians. It travelled in 1944 to Britain, opening 23 October in Glasgow and touring England (11 cities in the provinces), Ireland, and Wales and playing at the Hippodrome in London (1 Feb-7 Apr 1945, including a command performance 28 February). Performances followed in Paris’ Théâtre Marigny, the Brussels Music Hall, and Amsterdam’s Carré Theatre. Meet the Navy closed 12 September in Oldenburg in occupied Germany. In 1945 the National Film Board produced the film Meet the Navy on Tour. Though plans for a Broadway run fell through, the show itself was filmed in November in Britain.

Meet the Navy included skits, dance routines, and several songs: ‘In Your Little Chapeau,’ ‘Rockettes and the Wrens,’ ‘Brothers-in-Arms,’ ‘Meet the Navy,’ and ‘Beauty on Duty,’ all by R.W. Harwood (words) and P.E. Quinn (music); ‘The Boys in the Bellbottom Trousers’ by Quinn; ‘Shore Leave’ by Noel Langley and Henry Sherman (words) and Quinn; and the showstopper (sung by John Pratt) ‘You’ll Get Used to It’, with words by Pratt to music by Freddy Grant. Eric Wild (who conducted the pit orchestra) and Robert Russell Bennett arranged the music.

Leading roles were taken by Pratt, Robert Goodier, Cameron Grant, and Lionel Merton. Other featured performers included Dixie Dean, Ivan Romanoff (who conducted a balalaika orchestra and a chorus in ‘Scena Russki’), Carl Tapscott (who did choral arrangements), the bass Oscar Natzke, and the dance team Alan and Blanche Lund. Members of the 25-piece orchestra included the violinists Victor Feldbrill, Bill Richards, and Joseph Sera, the trombonist Ted Elfstrom, and the saxophonist-clarinetist Howard ‘Cokie’ Campbell.

After the London debut of Meet the Navy, Beverley Baxter wrote in the London Evening Standard: ‘Why is this piece so exhilarating, so completely satisfying and, since the first class always touches the emotions, why was it so stirring? Perhaps the answer is that quite outside the professional slickness and the terrific pace of the whole thing, we were seeing the story of Canada unconsciously unfolding itself to our eyes’.

In 1980, to celebrate the 70th anniversary of the Canadian navy, the Nova Scotia government revived Meet the Navy with several members of the original cast.

Phillips, Ruth. ‘The history of the Royal Canadian Navy’s World War II show Meet the Navy,’ unpublished manuscript (1973)

Southworth, Jean. ‘Actor revives his wartime role,’ Ottawa Journal, 19 Aug 1980

From: The Encyclopaedia of Music in Canada
www.thecanadianencyclopedia.com/index.cfm?PgNm=TCE&Pa…

The Royal Canadian Navy Show: “Meet the Navy”: Herbert C. Barber
Occupy Toronto
Image by bill barber
In 1943/44 my dad, who was enlisted in the Royal Canadian Navy, travelled with the Navy Show which was entitled, "Meet the Navy". Not sure he was actually in the cast, so I’ll have to pull his file at Archives Canada in Ottawa. Since he was a Certified Public Accountant, he might have watched the books. The show went across Canada by train. I know that Dad was not with the production that went overseas in 1945.

Dad is second from the right in the above photo. Here’s the story of the Navy Show:

From my Herbert Charles Barber Collection
www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/collections/7215760076…

"Meet the Navy" was a Royal Canadian Navy musical revue produced during World War II under the supervision of Capt Joseph P. Connolly, director of Special Services for the RCN. Rehearsals began in June 1943 at Hart House in Toronto. The production staff and company were recognized officially, though somewhat after the fact, by a Government of Canada Treasury Board order-in-council, 13 Aug 1943, as ‘an Establishment to be known as "The Navy Show" for the… Entertainment of Naval, Army and Air Force personnel on Active Service; Promotion of recruiting; [and] Maintenance of public morale and goodwill’.

The show itself, called "Meet the Navy" and directed by Louis Silver (a Hollywood producer) and Larry Ceballos (a Broadway choreographer), was premiered for servicemen 2 September at Toronto’s Victoria Theatre and opened to the public 4 September. It opened in Ottawa 15 September at the Capitol Theatre (Ottawa). During a year-long national tour, which covered some 10,000 miles by train, Meet the Navy entertained about a half-million Canadians. It travelled in 1944 to Britain, opening 23 October in Glasgow and touring England (11 cities in the provinces), Ireland, and Wales and playing at the Hippodrome in London (1 Feb-7 Apr 1945, including a command performance 28 February). Performances followed in Paris’ Théâtre Marigny, the Brussels Music Hall, and Amsterdam’s Carré Theatre. Meet the Navy closed 12 September in Oldenburg in occupied Germany. In 1945 the National Film Board produced the film Meet the Navy on Tour. Though plans for a Broadway run fell through, the show itself was filmed in November in Britain.

Meet the Navy included skits, dance routines, and several songs: ‘In Your Little Chapeau,’ ‘Rockettes and the Wrens,’ ‘Brothers-in-Arms,’ ‘Meet the Navy,’ and ‘Beauty on Duty,’ all by R.W. Harwood (words) and P.E. Quinn (music); ‘The Boys in the Bellbottom Trousers’ by Quinn; ‘Shore Leave’ by Noel Langley and Henry Sherman (words) and Quinn; and the showstopper (sung by John Pratt) ‘You’ll Get Used to It’, with words by Pratt to music by Freddy Grant. Eric Wild (who conducted the pit orchestra) and Robert Russell Bennett arranged the music.

Leading roles were taken by Pratt, Robert Goodier, Cameron Grant, and Lionel Merton. Other featured performers included Dixie Dean, Ivan Romanoff (who conducted a balalaika orchestra and a chorus in ‘Scena Russki’), Carl Tapscott (who did choral arrangements), the bass Oscar Natzke, and the dance team Alan and Blanche Lund. Members of the 25-piece orchestra included the violinists Victor Feldbrill, Bill Richards, and Joseph Sera, the trombonist Ted Elfstrom, and the saxophonist-clarinetist Howard ‘Cokie’ Campbell.

After the London debut of Meet the Navy, Beverley Baxter wrote in the London Evening Standard: ‘Why is this piece so exhilarating, so completely satisfying and, since the first class always touches the emotions, why was it so stirring? Perhaps the answer is that quite outside the professional slickness and the terrific pace of the whole thing, we were seeing the story of Canada unconsciously unfolding itself to our eyes’.

In 1980, to celebrate the 70th anniversary of the Canadian navy, the Nova Scotia government revived Meet the Navy with several members of the original cast.

Phillips, Ruth. ‘The history of the Royal Canadian Navy’s World War II show Meet the Navy,’ unpublished manuscript (1973)

Southworth, Jean. ‘Actor revives his wartime role,’ Ottawa Journal, 19 Aug 1980

From: The Encyclopaedia of Music in Canada
www.thecanadianencyclopedia.com/index.cfm?PgNm=TCE&Pa…

The Royal Canadian Navy Show: “Meet the Navy”: Herbert C. Barber
Occupy Toronto
Image by bill barber
In 1943/44 my dad, who was enlisted in the Royal Canadian Navy, travelled with the Navy Show which was entitled, "Meet the Navy". Not sure he was actually in the cast, so I’ll have to pull his file at Archives Canada in Ottawa. Since he was a Certified Public Accountant, he might have watched the books. The show went across Canada by train. I know that Dad was not with the production that went overseas in 1945.

Dad is second from the right in the above photo. Here’s the story of the Navy Show:

From my Herbert Charles Barber Collection
www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/collections/7215760076…

"Meet the Navy" was a Royal Canadian Navy musical revue produced during World War II under the supervision of Capt Joseph P. Connolly, director of Special Services for the RCN. Rehearsals began in June 1943 at Hart House in Toronto. The production staff and company were recognized officially, though somewhat after the fact, by a Government of Canada Treasury Board order-in-council, 13 Aug 1943, as ‘an Establishment to be known as "The Navy Show" for the… Entertainment of Naval, Army and Air Force personnel on Active Service; Promotion of recruiting; [and] Maintenance of public morale and goodwill’.

The show itself, called "Meet the Navy" and directed by Louis Silver (a Hollywood producer) and Larry Ceballos (a Broadway choreographer), was premiered for servicemen 2 September at Toronto’s Victoria Theatre and opened to the public 4 September. It opened in Ottawa 15 September at the Capitol Theatre (Ottawa). During a year-long national tour, which covered some 10,000 miles by train, Meet the Navy entertained about a half-million Canadians. It travelled in 1944 to Britain, opening 23 October in Glasgow and touring England (11 cities in the provinces), Ireland, and Wales and playing at the Hippodrome in London (1 Feb-7 Apr 1945, including a command performance 28 February). Performances followed in Paris’ Théâtre Marigny, the Brussels Music Hall, and Amsterdam’s Carré Theatre. Meet the Navy closed 12 September in Oldenburg in occupied Germany. In 1945 the National Film Board produced the film Meet the Navy on Tour. Though plans for a Broadway run fell through, the show itself was filmed in November in Britain.

Meet the Navy included skits, dance routines, and several songs: ‘In Your Little Chapeau,’ ‘Rockettes and the Wrens,’ ‘Brothers-in-Arms,’ ‘Meet the Navy,’ and ‘Beauty on Duty,’ all by R.W. Harwood (words) and P.E. Quinn (music); ‘The Boys in the Bellbottom Trousers’ by Quinn; ‘Shore Leave’ by Noel Langley and Henry Sherman (words) and Quinn; and the showstopper (sung by John Pratt) ‘You’ll Get Used to It’, with words by Pratt to music by Freddy Grant. Eric Wild (who conducted the pit orchestra) and Robert Russell Bennett arranged the music.

Leading roles were taken by Pratt, Robert Goodier, Cameron Grant, and Lionel Merton. Other featured performers included Dixie Dean, Ivan Romanoff (who conducted a balalaika orchestra and a chorus in ‘Scena Russki’), Carl Tapscott (who did choral arrangements), the bass Oscar Natzke, and the dance team Alan and Blanche Lund. Members of the 25-piece orchestra included the violinists Victor Feldbrill, Bill Richards, and Joseph Sera, the trombonist Ted Elfstrom, and the saxophonist-clarinetist Howard ‘Cokie’ Campbell.

After the London debut of Meet the Navy, Beverley Baxter wrote in the London Evening Standard: ‘Why is this piece so exhilarating, so completely satisfying and, since the first class always touches the emotions, why was it so stirring? Perhaps the answer is that quite outside the professional slickness and the terrific pace of the whole thing, we were seeing the story of Canada unconsciously unfolding itself to our eyes’.

In 1980, to celebrate the 70th anniversary of the Canadian navy, the Nova Scotia government revived Meet the Navy with several members of the original cast.

Phillips, Ruth. ‘The history of the Royal Canadian Navy’s World War II show Meet the Navy,’ unpublished manuscript (1973)

Southworth, Jean. ‘Actor revives his wartime role,’ Ottawa Journal, 19 Aug 1980

From: The Encyclopaedia of Music in Canada
www.thecanadianencyclopedia.com/index.cfm?PgNm=TCE&Pa…

The Royal Canadian Navy Show: “Meet the Navy”: Herbert C. Barber
Occupy Toronto
Image by bill barber
In 1943/44 my dad, who was enlisted in the Royal Canadian Navy, travelled with the Navy Show which was entitled, "Meet the Navy". Not sure he was actually in the cast, so I’ll have to pull his file at Archives Canada in Ottawa. Since he was a Certified Public Accountant, he might have watched the books. The show went across Canada by train. I know that Dad was not with the production that went overseas in 1945.

Dad is second from the right in the above photo. Here’s the story of the Navy Show:

From my Herbert Charles Barber Collection
www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/collections/7215760076…

"Meet the Navy" was a Royal Canadian Navy musical revue produced during World War II under the supervision of Capt Joseph P. Connolly, director of Special Services for the RCN. Rehearsals began in June 1943 at Hart House in Toronto. The production staff and company were recognized officially, though somewhat after the fact, by a Government of Canada Treasury Board order-in-council, 13 Aug 1943, as ‘an Establishment to be known as "The Navy Show" for the… Entertainment of Naval, Army and Air Force personnel on Active Service; Promotion of recruiting; [and] Maintenance of public morale and goodwill’.

The show itself, called "Meet the Navy" and directed by Louis Silver (a Hollywood producer) and Larry Ceballos (a Broadway choreographer), was premiered for servicemen 2 September at Toronto’s Victoria Theatre and opened to the public 4 September. It opened in Ottawa 15 September at the Capitol Theatre (Ottawa). During a year-long national tour, which covered some 10,000 miles by train, Meet the Navy entertained about a half-million Canadians. It travelled in 1944 to Britain, opening 23 October in Glasgow and touring England (11 cities in the provinces), Ireland, and Wales and playing at the Hippodrome in London (1 Feb-7 Apr 1945, including a command performance 28 February). Performances followed in Paris’ Théâtre Marigny, the Brussels Music Hall, and Amsterdam’s Carré Theatre. Meet the Navy closed 12 September in Oldenburg in occupied Germany. In 1945 the National Film Board produced the film Meet the Navy on Tour. Though plans for a Broadway run fell through, the show itself was filmed in November in Britain.

Meet the Navy included skits, dance routines, and several songs: ‘In Your Little Chapeau,’ ‘Rockettes and the Wrens,’ ‘Brothers-in-Arms,’ ‘Meet the Navy,’ and ‘Beauty on Duty,’ all by R.W. Harwood (words) and P.E. Quinn (music); ‘The Boys in the Bellbottom Trousers’ by Quinn; ‘Shore Leave’ by Noel Langley and Henry Sherman (words) and Quinn; and the showstopper (sung by John Pratt) ‘You’ll Get Used to It’, with words by Pratt to music by Freddy Grant. Eric Wild (who conducted the pit orchestra) and Robert Russell Bennett arranged the music.

Leading roles were taken by Pratt, Robert Goodier, Cameron Grant, and Lionel Merton. Other featured performers included Dixie Dean, Ivan Romanoff (who conducted a balalaika orchestra and a chorus in ‘Scena Russki’), Carl Tapscott (who did choral arrangements), the bass Oscar Natzke, and the dance team Alan and Blanche Lund. Members of the 25-piece orchestra included the violinists Victor Feldbrill, Bill Richards, and Joseph Sera, the trombonist Ted Elfstrom, and the saxophonist-clarinetist Howard ‘Cokie’ Campbell.

After the London debut of Meet the Navy, Beverley Baxter wrote in the London Evening Standard: ‘Why is this piece so exhilarating, so completely satisfying and, since the first class always touches the emotions, why was it so stirring? Perhaps the answer is that quite outside the professional slickness and the terrific pace of the whole thing, we were seeing the story of Canada unconsciously unfolding itself to our eyes’.

In 1980, to celebrate the 70th anniversary of the Canadian navy, the Nova Scotia government revived Meet the Navy with several members of the original cast.

Phillips, Ruth. ‘The history of the Royal Canadian Navy’s World War II show Meet the Navy,’ unpublished manuscript (1973)

Southworth, Jean. ‘Actor revives his wartime role,’ Ottawa Journal, 19 Aug 1980

From: The Encyclopaedia of Music in Canada
www.thecanadianencyclopedia.com/index.cfm?PgNm=TCE&Pa…

60 Comments

  1. SJKen
    July 3, 2013, 10:36 pm   /  Reply

    Wow.. so historical & inspirational story. You must have sophisticated feelings when you see all these old photos with your father’s image … that’s very very cherish indeed.

  2. Kelvin Wong (aka PiscesRomance)
    July 3, 2013, 10:44 pm   /  Reply

    Wow! thanks for sharing this!

    This is Perfect!

    The Perfect Photographer

    This photo has been selected for The Perfect Photographer Award
    Please add this image to The Perfect Photographer, Awards 2 Fave 2
    And tag the photo with "The Perfect Photographer"

  3. thru jens eyes
    July 3, 2013, 11:33 pm   /  Reply

    such a cool photo and story!! how great to have this and share w/us! thanks so much 🙂

  4. southwest girl
    July 4, 2013, 12:24 am   /  Reply

    wow such a cool story bill and a wonderful vintage shot

  5. Ske'
    July 4, 2013, 12:30 am   /  Reply

    fantastic shot Bill…..

    great
    You have been INVITED to join
    ♡ Flickr Golden Photo ♡

    Congratulations!!!

  6. msamaclean ©...be back soon!...;-)
    July 4, 2013, 12:52 am   /  Reply

    Great history & photo!

  7. grizzbass
    July 4, 2013, 1:48 am   /  Reply

    nice little bit of history. thanks for sharing

  8. ClickHappyJohn
    July 4, 2013, 2:36 am   /  Reply

    Great story Bill. I too was in the Royal Navy 1948 – 1956. Never been on a snow plough

  9. craig the codger
    July 4, 2013, 3:35 am   /  Reply

    a great story and picture.

  10. ilsebatten
    July 4, 2013, 3:41 am   /  Reply

    What an incredible story. I am learning more and more about Canada from my contacts on flickr – my Canadian education continues. Really nostalgic shot

  11. Merry Christmas !!!
    July 4, 2013, 4:24 am   /  Reply

    wonderful shot !!

    This is a MuLti MeGa ShOt.!
    Here is your invitation to post your shot to the Best of the Best:
    multi_megashot_invite_only_
    Please tag your shot: MultiMegaShot

  12. ~~~~~*
    July 4, 2013, 4:29 am   /  Reply

    What a great story! Your info finding is amazing. Wish that I could find out even half that much about my family…

    Thank you for your fave and kind words on my photo; it’s much appreciated! :))
    Re moving children as per DavidJohn36, photo…moved a son three times, felt like 30 times, that much stuff! He always was one for collecting all sorts of tat! :))

  13. Faranak5
    July 4, 2013, 5:00 am   /  Reply

    a nice memorable diary ,,,thanks for the good information ,,and story,,very nice,,i’m sure you write so well as a very good author,,,I wish i could write nice English stories ,and poems ,,,Good luck !

  14. CORDAN
    July 4, 2013, 5:41 am   /  Reply

    Very nice Bill! Thanks for sharing these.


    Seen on your photo stream. (?)

  15. johncarey/
    July 4, 2013, 5:56 am   /  Reply

    Very cool stuff. Thanks for the story!

  16. l plater
    July 4, 2013, 6:49 am   /  Reply

    Nice history lesson. This photo should be treasured.

  17. CrazyDinx
    July 4, 2013, 7:08 am   /  Reply

    Lovely old photo, and great history behind it too.

  18. Francesco E
    July 4, 2013, 7:12 am   /  Reply

    Amazing…thanks for sharing this Bill!

  19. Joy C.
    July 4, 2013, 7:12 am   /  Reply

    Thanks for sharing this wonderful picture and story of your dad. What stories he had to share with you! My dad use to share his stories of growing up and being in WWII. I wrote a lot of them down when he was still alive which I’m so thankful for now!

  20. swimmingintheether (working overtime)
    July 4, 2013, 7:51 am   /  Reply

    Oh how cool is this! Thank you for sharing it with us. 🙂

  21. Terri.Flickr.Chic ♥
    July 4, 2013, 7:52 am   /  Reply

    This is wonderful.

  22. ScarletPeaches
    July 4, 2013, 8:21 am   /  Reply

    what an incredible image to have!!! just wonderful.

  23. KelleynRudy
    July 4, 2013, 9:18 am   /  Reply

    Wonderful shot !! and so full of history. !!

  24. Adettara Photography
    July 4, 2013, 10:12 am   /  Reply

    Great shot. Thank you for the story!

  25. ineedathis
    July 4, 2013, 10:31 am   /  Reply

    Very interesting story Bill, I do love the research that you do, it is very enlightening and I do thank you for sharing this,
    I often search for information of the past, I guess my desire to learn never stops, enjoy your day my friend:-)

  26. nature photographer.
    July 4, 2013, 10:56 am   /  Reply

    Great shot..This photo should be treasured….!!! Well done…..

  27. Sandra Leidholdt
    July 4, 2013, 11:00 am   /  Reply

    Bill – this is a fantastic treasure!

  28. The Horse Whisperer
    July 4, 2013, 11:25 am   /  Reply

    cool shot and narrative!

  29. .alǝ
    July 4, 2013, 11:27 am   /  Reply

    This is an amazing photograph ! a treasure indeed ! if your father was in the cast, maybe you’ll get other pictures where he stands !

  30. JJ & Special K
    July 4, 2013, 11:34 am   /  Reply

    What a treasure!! Your Grandkids will be impressed someday,when you show them thier GREAT grand Dad!!

  31. bookish in north park
    July 4, 2013, 11:59 am   /  Reply

    That’s so neat. I can even see in this photo that you look like your dad.

  32. kmt65
    July 4, 2013, 12:07 pm   /  Reply

    Thanks for sharing the photo and the story, Bill. That’s a great photo!

  33. C.J. Herrick
    July 4, 2013, 12:30 pm   /  Reply

    Pretty awesome photo, I love the vintage.

  34. baby kunnikulangara
    July 4, 2013, 1:28 pm   /  Reply

    Amazing…. thanks for sharing !!!!

  35. altamons
    July 4, 2013, 2:14 pm   /  Reply

    Fabulous shot from the archives!! Wow! So cool!

    Seen on your photo stream. (?)

  36. AnnuskA - AnnA Theodora
    July 4, 2013, 3:05 pm   /  Reply

    love historic shots!! 😉

  37. Kazoot toozaK
    July 4, 2013, 3:39 pm   /  Reply

    Fantastic photo. Such a treasure.

  38. marni*
    July 4, 2013, 4:33 pm   /  Reply

    What a fantastic piece of history, Bill. So nicely done!

  39. Márcia_Marton
    July 4, 2013, 5:08 pm   /  Reply

    Very cool shot and fantastic story my friend!

  40. Rigs✿
    July 4, 2013, 5:48 pm   /  Reply

    Excellent work Bill
    this looks so old
    Have a great day my Friend

  41. memory in time( Patti )
    July 4, 2013, 6:02 pm   /  Reply

    What an amazing piece of history Bill. A great story behind this. My dad was a Navy man also(U.S.!)

  42. basilly
    July 4, 2013, 7:02 pm   /  Reply

    a wonderful piece of your family history for generations to enjoy…lovely photo Bill.

  43. *~Dawn~*
    July 4, 2013, 7:03 pm   /  Reply

    What an amazing story, and experience for your father. It would be interesting to do some research to find out more about your father’s role in this. Thanks for sharing! 🙂

  44. _ØяAcLә_
    July 4, 2013, 7:54 pm   /  Reply

    A most beautiful Image and Marvelous capture of your proud family history Bill* This is wonderful. I like memory in time(Patti)* am a Navy bratt as well & I know that your father would be proud~~~

    Superb Image." :)) This is "EXCELLENT"!!!!

  45. _ØяAcLә_
    July 4, 2013, 8:04 pm   /  Reply

    Hi, I’m an admin for a group called Black & White & Sepia Photofanatics, and we’d love to have this added to the group!

    This Image deserves The Excellence in Achievement Award!
    Black & White & Sepia Photofanatics

  46. Little Pebble For the animal rights!
    July 4, 2013, 8:19 pm   /  Reply

    So nice …they look like proud conquers! very nice and nostalgic Photo!

    And what a lovely piece of history!

  47. Asdak Photography
    July 4, 2013, 9:14 pm   /  Reply

    Fantastic image and a great sense of history.

  48. vereiasz
    July 4, 2013, 9:48 pm   /  Reply

    thank you for sharing this great story with us Bill- it’s amazing! never heard of the show, but your dad sure had a great time!

  49. Ashley1954
    July 4, 2013, 10:00 pm   /  Reply

    Great story, beautiful old picture!!!!!

  50. pennyeast
    July 4, 2013, 10:54 pm   /  Reply

    What a wonderful memento to have!! Thank you for sharing the story too!! Thanks for your visit and kind words!


    Seen on your photo stream. (?)

  51. jim270.
    July 4, 2013, 11:08 pm   /  Reply

    Wonderful piece of history, my friend! Thanks for sharing.

  52. Stina Baruh
    July 4, 2013, 11:25 pm   /  Reply

    Excellent story Bill !

  53. atranswe
    July 4, 2013, 11:54 pm   /  Reply

    Impressive engine and also historical interesting documentation.

  54. axiepics
    July 5, 2013, 12:41 am   /  Reply

    a great story – thanks for sharing.

  55. alsalam
    July 5, 2013, 12:49 am   /  Reply

    interesting story!

  56. *Lynne
    July 5, 2013, 1:36 am   /  Reply

    Love the old photo and thanks for the info–I have a couple
    of old shots that you might like, I sent you the link.

  57. João Morais
    July 5, 2013, 1:49 am   /  Reply

    Great moment of the past .

  58. ♫ jon argos ♫
    July 5, 2013, 2:17 am   /  Reply

    …what a terrific memory, Bill, and your description is very informative. Thanks, my friend. :~}

  59. Sharon's Photos
    July 5, 2013, 3:15 am   /  Reply

    So nice not only to see the photo but to know the story too! Thanks my friend!

  60. xollob58
    July 5, 2013, 3:59 am   /  Reply

    Excellent narrative to this great photo, Bill. A fascinating story. Grand job.

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